Written by Mike Rice on Jul 5th, 2013 in Past Projects
Reher Bakery retail space.  Photograph by Marilyn Kaplan

Reher Bakery retail space. Photograph by Marilyn Kaplan

On June 5, 2010, the Reher Bakery was opened to the general public for the first time in conjunction with Timefest Kingston, a city-wide celebration of history and culture.  People were allowed access to the bakery retail space, with much of its original shelving and cabinetry still intact, and the bakery work room, with its coal-fired oven dating back to c. 1916, and it’s dough-rising tables of similar vintage, in place as the Reher family left them.

Oven room set up for Timefest Kingston with  bakery equipment positioned as left by the Reher family and exhibit in place.  Photograph by Geoffrey Miller

Oven room set up for Timefest Kingston with
bakery equipment positioned as left by the Reher family and exhibit in place. Photograph by Geoffrey Miller

In addition to providing tours of the bakery itself, the committee mounted a new exhibit,  Rondout Revisited c. 1914.  Nothing of particular historical note distinguishes Rondout of 1914 from Rondout of 1913 or 1915, except that in 1914 a photographer, whose identity is unknown, captured a series of remarkable and haunting images of shop interiors from all over Kingston, including fifteen from the Rondout area.  They are time exposures for which the subjects had to pose motionless for one to three minutes.  These photographs formed the nucleus of this section of the exhibit, along with a series of maps listing the many businesses (over 100 between Spring Street and the Strand along Broadway alone) that combined to make Rondout a thriving commercial center.  The shop interiors series are part of the Edwin M. and Ruth Ford Photograph Collection housed in the archives of Friends of Historic Kingston.

Mufson Brothers Grocery & Meat Market, 98 Broadway, c. 1914.  Courtesy Friends of Historic Kingston

Mufson Brothers Grocery & Meat Market, 98 Broadway, c. 1914. Courtesy Friends of Historic Kingston

Posters outlining the history of the oven and dough mixer were also on display, as was another exhibit, Intersections, which juxtaposed historical images of buildings and streetscapes with contemporary views from a similar vantage point.

The exhibit remained open on a limited basis through November 2010.

Curator: Geoffrey Miller
Artistic Director: Susan Basch
Technical Assistance: William Sterling

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